Categories

Eddie Irvine 1993 Jordan Formula One Arai RACE WORN Helmet (DEBUT - JAPANESE GP - "THE SENNA PUNCH!")

Eddie Irvine 1993 Jordan Formula One Arai RACE WORN Helmet (DEBUT - JAPANESE GP - "THE SENNA PUNCH!")
Views: 1450 Brand: Formula One
Product Code: HELMET-EI1993JAP
Availability: In Stock
$11,900.00 CAD
Sale Price:$8,700.00 CAD
Qty: Add to Cart

Eddie Irvine 1993 Jordan Formula One Arai RACE WORN Helmet (DEBUT - JAPANESE GP)


Authentic FORMULA ONE Helmet - This authentic Arai Helmet was worn by Eddie Irvine during the 1993 Japanese GP while driving for Jordan.

Irvine made his Formula One debut at the Japanese Grand Prix, partnering Rubens Barrichello at the Jordan Grand Prix team. He made an immediate impact, not only by scoring a point with sixth place, but by unlapping himself against race leader, and subsequent winner, Ayrton Senna. After the race, Senna, angry at what he perceived to be "unprofessional" driving, approached Irvine in the Jordan hospitality unit, and following an altercation, threw a punch at Irvine, for which he received a suspended two-race ban.

THIS IS ONE OF F1'S NOTORIOUS STORIES: Senna was a triple World Champion and the 1993 Japanese Grand Prix marked Irvine's F1 debut. The Northern Irishman had been chosen by Eddie Jordan because of his intimate knowledge of Suzuka thanks to three years racing in the Japanese F3000 series.

Irvine's promise was fulfilled by qualifying eighth, several places ahead of Jordan's usual position in the back half of the grid. Continuing to use his local knowledge at the start and finding grip on the outside of the first corner, Irvine jumped to fifth before Michael Schumacher (Benetton-Ford) and Damon Hill (Williams-Renault) asserted themselves and pushed the cheeky little Jordan-Hart out of the top six.

After about 20 laps, the arrival of rain upset the order, particularly when Jordan team leader Rubens Barrichello was the first to receive wets and Irvine was condemned to another increasingly treacherous 3.64 miles on slicks. By the time Irvine had stopped and worked his way back to seventh, the rain was easing and Hill, in fourth, had already returned to slicks.

Conditions were approaching the crossover point between wet and dry tyres. Hill was struggling and Irvine, knowing exactly where there was grip in the wet, caught the Williams and was keen to get by before his advantage disappeared and he had to pit. Catching them both

Tags: